Click here to close Hello! We notice that you are using Internet Explorer, which is not supported by Xenbase and may cause the site to display incorrectly. We suggest using a current version of Chrome, FireFox, or Safari.

Profile Publications(97)
XB-PERS-747

Chris Wylie

(retired)

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
3333 Burnet Avenue
Cincinnati, OH
45229-3039, USA

xenopus1@gmail.com

Phone:  513-636-4473

Research Description

Christopher Wylie discovered many fundamental cell and embryological processes, which are now the mainstay of Developmental Biology text books. Chris Wylie started his research career in 1963, at University College Hospital Medical School, followed by his BSc in 1966, and his PhD in 1971. He lectured in Anatomy at University College Londonand St. George's Hospital Medical School, where he was Chair and Professor of Anatomy and Embryology. Chris accepted a position the University of Cambridge, Zoology Department in 1988.

In Cambridge, Chris and Janet Heasman were part of the founding group (along with John Gurdon, Ron Laskey, and Martin Evans) whom successfully petitioned the UK’s two big funding agencies, the Wellcome Trust and the Cancer Research Campaign, to fund a major center for Developmental Biology in Cambridge. Originally named the Wellcome Trust/Cancer Research Campaign Institute for Cell and Developmental Biology, the globally important center was recently renamed The Gurdon Institute. 

In 1994 the Wylie-Heasman lab moved to the University of Minnesota School of Medicine. Continuing to promote Developmental Biology as an integral component of modern biomedical research, Wylie and Heasman relocated to the Division of Developmental Biology at Cincinnati Children’s Research Foundation in 2000.  Chris  retired in 2013, but continues to be involved in Dev. Biol through his roles in various sociaties and editorial boards.

Lab Memberships

Wylie Heasman Lab (Retired) (Principal Investigator/Director)

My Xenbase: [ Log-in / Register ]
version: [4.6.0]

Major funding for Xenbase is provided by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, grant P41 HD064556