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Cell & Developmental Biology of Xenopus at CSHL

Update:

Registration for upcoming Xenopus Course at CSHL is now open. http://meetings.cshl.edu/courses/2014/c-xeno14.shtml

The Cell and Developmental Biology of Xenopus course is designed for those new to the Xenopus field, as well as for those wanting a refresher course in emerging technologies. For instance, participants this year will be able to target their favorite gene by CRISPR/Cas9 methods. The course is open to investigators from all countries.

A diverse faculty will bring the most up-to-date results and theories to the students, making this course a valuable resource for young researchers starting out in this fast-moving and expansive field.

Xenopus is the leading vertebrate model for the analysis of gene function in development. The combination of lineage analysis, gene-knockout strategies, experimental manipulation of the embryo, and genomic/bioinformatic techniques, makes it ideal for studies on the molecular control of embryo patterning, morphogenesis and organogenesis. Moreover, recent advances in Xenopus genomics offer new opportunities to integrate computational strategies with experimental approaches, including genome editing-based strategies for gene knockout.

The course combines intensive laboratory training with daily lectures from recognized experts in the field. Students will learn both emerging technologies and classical techniques to study gene function in Xenopus development. An important element will be the informal interaction between students and course faculty. Technologies to be covered will include: oocyte and embryo culture, lineage analysis and experimental manipulation of embryos, time lapse imaging of morphogenesis, gain and loss of function analysis using mRNAs, antisense oligonucleotides and the CRISPR/Cas9 system, whole mount in situ hybridization, immunocytochemistry, genomics and bioinformatics, chromatin immunoprecipitation, preparation of transgenic embryos, and use of Xenopus tropicalis for genetic analyses. Substantial scholarships towards tuition, room and board are available based on stated need (apply in writing).

Check out the website for more details, and please feel free to contact Jerry Thomsen (gerald.h.thomsen@stonybrook.edu, office phone:  001-631-632-8536) if you have any questions.

 

Previous post from 12-03-2013:

CELL & DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY OF XENOPUS
APRIL 4-15, 2014
http://meetings.cshl.edu/courses/2014/c-xeno14.shtml
Application deadline:  January 31, 2013


Instructors:
Amy Sater, University of Houston
Gerald Thomsen, Stony Brook University
Karen Liu, King's College London


Dear Colleague -  We're pleased to announce the upcoming Xenopus Course at CSHL, and ask you to consider sending a member of your laboratory or group to participate, and to pass this announcement along to anyone who may benefit from this training. A diverse faculty will bring the most up-to-date results and theories to the students, making this course a valuable resource for young researchers starting out in this fast-moving and expansive field.

Xenopus is the leading vertebrate model for the analysis of gene function in development. The combination of lineage analysis, gene-knockout strategies, experimental manipulation of the embryo, and genomic/bioinformatic techniques, makes it ideal for studies on the molecular control of embryo patterning, morphogenesis and organogenesis. Moreover, recent advances in Xenopus genomics offer new opportunities to integrate computational strategies with experimental approaches, including genome editing-based strategies for gene knockout. The course combines intensive laboratory training with daily lectures from recognized experts in the field. Students will learn both emerging technologies and classical techniques to study gene function in Xenopus development. An important element will be the informal interaction between students and course faculty.

Technologies to be covered will include: oocyte and embryo culture, lineage analysis and experimental manipulation of embryos, time lapse imaging of morphogenesis, gain and loss of function analysis using mRNAs, antisense oligonucleotides and the CRISPR/Cas9 system, whole mount in situ hybridization, immunocytochemistry, genomics and bioinformatics, chromatin immunoprecipitation, preparation of transgenic embryos, and use of Xenopus tropicalis for genetic analyses.

The Cell and Developmental Biology of Xenopus course is designed for those new to the Xenopus field, as well as for those wanting a refresher course in emerging technologies. For instance, participants this year will be able to target their favorite gene by CRISPR/Cas9 methods. The course is open to investigators from all countries.

Substantial scholarships towards tuition, room and board are available based on stated need (apply in writing). Check out the website for more details, and please feel free to contact me if you have any questions.   http://meetings.cshl.edu/courses/2014/c-xeno14.shtml

Best regards,

- Jerry

Gerald H. Thomsen, PhD
Professor
Biochemistry and Cell Biology
Center for Developmental Genetics
Stony Brook University
Stony Brook, NY 11794-5215

gerald.h.thomsen@stonybrook.edu
office phone:  001-631-632-8536

Last Updated: 2014-02-03

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