Click here to close Hello! We notice that you are using Internet Explorer, which is not supported by Xenbase and may cause the site to display incorrectly. We suggest using a current version of Chrome, FireFox, or Safari.

NIH launches new initiative to study the basis of human birth defects

Research Opportunities in Structural Birth Defects

There are some important opportunities at the NIH in which the utility of Xenopus for human congenital disorders is ideal.

Below is a summary of some activities and web links where you can obtain more details.

1. For those interested in submitting a P01 to NIHCD for structural birth defects research, please see this NIH Guide Notice:

Notice of Intent to Publish a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Developmental Mechanisms of Human Structural Birth Defects (P01)
Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) Number: RFA-HD-16-009

Reissue of RFA-HD-10-006


Key Dates:
Release Date: July 15, 2015
Open Date (Earliest Submission Date):  October 18, 2015
Letter of Intent Due Date:  October 18, 2015
Scientific Merit Review:  March 2016
Advisory Council Review:  May 2016
Earliest Start Date: July 2016
Expiration Date: November 19, 2015
Issued by
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
Purpose
This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages innovative, multidisciplinary, interactive, and synergistic program project (P01) grant applications from institutes/organizations that propose to integrate basic, translational, and clinical approaches to understanding the developmental biology and genetic basis of major congenital structural human malformations. The projects must share a common central theme, focus, or objective on a specific developmental structural malformation or class of anomalies that is genotypically, mechanistically, biologically, or phenotypically analogous or homologous in both animal models and humans.

For complete details follow this link.

 

2. Developmental Biology and Structural Variation Branch (DBSVB) of NICHD has a long-standing commitment to bring together researchers who are interested in multidisciplinary approaches to enhancing our understanding of the genetic epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis, developmental biology, and genetics of structural birth defects. Some examples of the birth defects that have been supported by this group are: neural tube defects, cardiac defects, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, limb defects, congenital contractures, skeletal dysplasia and craniofacial defects.

In January 2014, DBSVB sponsored the “Developing an Interdisciplinary Research Agenda for Genetics of Birth Defects” workshop. A summary of this meeting can be found at:

     http://www.nichd.nih.gov/about/org/der/branches/dbsvb/programs/trans_NIH_SBDWG/Documents/birth_defects_summary.pdf

In December 2014, DBSVS held the 10th Annual Structural Birth Defects meeting at which several researchers holding R01 and P01 grants from NICHD reported on their findings. In addition, a round table discussion on “Establishing Successful Basic Science and Clinical Collaborations to Study Structural Birth Defects” was produced as a videocast (http://videocast.nih.gov/summary.asp?live=15194&bhcp=1), and tips for how to set up a collaboration are posted:

     http://www.nichd.nih.gov/about/meetings/2014/Documents/birth_defects_meeting.pdf

3. Trans-NIH Structural Birth Defects Working Group. This group is comprised of extramural program officials from NIH components whose missions include research into structural birth defects, with the ultimate goal of facilitating advances in our understanding of the etiology, mechanisms, epidemiology, prevention, and treatment of structural birth defects. The participating Institutes and Program contracts can be found at this website:

    http://www.nichd.nih.gov/NIHstructuralbirthdefectsWG

At this website, under “Reports and Publications” there is additional information related to recent birth defects meetings, including those mentioned above.

It’s in the DNA: Animal Models Offer Clues to Human Development featuring the use of animal models in birth defects research

http://www.nichd.nih.gov/news/resources/spotlight/Pages/010915-animal-models.aspx

NIH Scientists Combine Efforts to Advance Birth Defects Research highlighting the Trans-NIH Structural Birth Defects Working Group

http://www.nichd.nih.gov/news/resources/spotlight/Pages/012015-birth-defects-working-group.aspx

Birth Defects Research Findings from the NICHD highlighting research published in 2014 from several NICHD-funded investigators

http://www.nichd.nih.gov/news/resources/spotlight/Pages/013015-birth-defects-research.aspx

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages innovative, multidisciplinary, interactive, and synergistic program project (P01) grant applications from institutes/organizations that propose to integrate basic, translational, and clinical approaches to understanding the developmental biology and genetic basis of major congenital structural human malformations. The projects must share a common central theme, focus, or objective on a specific developmental structural malformation or class of anomalies that is genotypically, mechanistically, biologically, or phenotypically analogous or homologous in both animal models and humans.

Last Updated: 2015-08-04

My Xenbase: [ Log-in / Register ]
version: [4.5.0]

Major funding for Xenbase is provided by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, grant P41 HD064556