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XB-ART-10222
J Cell Biol October 2, 2000; 151 (1): 155-66.

Dynein, dynactin, and kinesin II''s interaction with microtubules is regulated during bidirectional organelle transport.

Reese EL , Haimo LT .


Abstract
The microtubule motors, cytoplasmic dynein and kinesin II, drive pigmented organelles in opposite directions in Xenopus melanophores, but the mechanism by which these or other motors are regulated to control the direction of organelle transport has not been previously elucidated. We find that cytoplasmic dynein, dynactin, and kinesin II remain on pigment granules during aggregation and dispersion in melanophores, indicating that control of direction is not mediated by a cyclic association of motors with these organelles. However, the ability of dynein, dynactin, and kinesin II to bind to microtubules varies as a function of the state of aggregation or dispersion of the pigment in the cells from which these molecules are isolated. Dynein and dynactin bind to microtubules when obtained from cells with aggregated pigment, whereas kinesin II binds to microtubules when obtained from cells with dispersed pigment. Moreover, the microtubule binding activity of these motors/dynactin can be reversed in vitro by the kinases and phosphatase that regulate the direction of pigment granule transport in vivo. These findings suggest that phosphorylation controls the direction of pigment granule transport by altering the ability of dynein, dynactin, and kinesin II to interact with microtubules.

PubMed ID: 11018061
PMC ID: PMC2189799
Article link: J Cell Biol


Species referenced: Xenopus laevis
Genes referenced: abl1 dnai1 dync1li1 herpud1 klc1 npy4r ptpa tub


Article Images: [+] show captions
References [+] :
, Retraction. Dynein, dynactin, and kinesin II's interaction with microtubules is regulated during bidirectional organelle transport. 2003, Pubmed