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XB-ART-37633
J Cell Biol. May 5, 2008; 181 (3): 411-9.

CENP-E combines a slow, processive motor and a flexible coiled coil to produce an essential motile kinetochore tether.

Kim Y , Heuser JE , Waterman CM , Cleveland DW .


Abstract
The mitotic kinesin centromere protein E (CENP-E) is an essential kinetochore component that directly contributes to the capture and stabilization of spindle microtubules by kinetochores. Although reduction in CENP-E leads to high rates of whole chromosome missegregation, neither its properties as a microtubule-dependent motor nor how it contributes to the dynamic linkage between kinetochores and microtubules is known. Using single-molecule assays, we demonstrate that CENP-E is a very slow, highly processive motor that maintains microtubule attachment for long periods. Direct visualization of full-length Xenopus laevis CENP-E reveals a highly flexible 230-nm coiled coil separating its kinetochore-binding and motor domains. We also show that full-length CENP-E is a slow plus end-directed motor whose activity is essential for metaphase chromosome alignment. We propose that the highly processive microtubule-dependent motor activity of CENP-E serves to power chromosome congression and provides a flexible, motile tether linking kinetochores to dynamic spindle microtubules.

PubMed ID: 18443223
PMC ID: PMC2364708
Article link: J Cell Biol.
Grant support: GM29513 NIGMS NIH HHS , R01 GM029513 NIGMS NIH HHS

Genes referenced: cenpe
Antibodies referenced:
Morpholinos referenced:
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