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XB-ART-39455
Dev Dyn. June 1, 2009; 238 (6): 1379-88.

Database of queryable gene expression patterns for Xenopus.

Gilchrist MJ , Christensen MB , Bronchain O , Brunet F , Chesneau A , Fenger U , Geach TJ , Ironfield HV , Kaya F , Kricha S , Lea R , Massé K , Néant I , Paillard E , Parain K , Perron M , Sinzelle L , Souopgui J , Thuret R , Ymlahi-Ouazzani Q , Pollet N .


Abstract
The precise localization of gene expression within the developing embryo, and how it changes over time, is one of the most important sources of information for elucidating gene function. As a searchable resource, this information has up until now been largely inaccessible to the Xenopus community. Here, we present a new database of Xenopus gene expression patterns, queryable by specific location or region in the embryo. Pattern matching can be driven either from an existing in situ image, or from a user-defined pattern based on development stage schematic diagrams. The data are derived from the work of a group of 21 Xenopus researchers over a period of 4 days. We used a novel, rapid manual annotation tool, XenMARK, which exploits the ability of the human brain to make the necessary distortions in transferring data from the in situ images to the standard schematic geometry. Developmental Dynamics 238:1379-1388, 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

PubMed ID: 19347954
Article link: Dev Dyn.
Grant support: Wellcome Trust

Genes referenced: ak1 apobec2 atp2a1 c12orf4 cav1 chrd.1 cytb hacd1 klhl41 lama5 mtfr1l myh8 nexn nxpe2 olig4 rab5b sesn2 sparc srl ssr2 thbs4 tnni1.2 ttn



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