On Friday November 24, 2017 around 5 pm EST portions of Xenbase may be intermittently available.

Click on this message to dismiss it.
Click here to close Hello! We notice that you are using Internet Explorer, which is not supported by Xenbase and may cause the site to display incorrectly. We suggest using a current version of Chrome, FireFox, or Safari.
XB-ART-40396
Mech Dev. December 1, 2009; 126 (11-12): 925-41.

Spemann''s organizer and the self-regulation of embryonic fields.



Abstract
Embryos and developing organs have the remarkable ability of self-regenerating after experimental manipulations. In the Xenopus blastula half-embryos can regenerate the missing part, producing identical twins. Studies on the molecular nature of Spemann''s organizer have revealed that self-regulation results from the battle between two signaling centers under reciprocal transcriptional control. Long-range communication between the dorsal and ventral sides is mediated by the action of growth factor antagonists - such as the BMP antagonist Chordin - that regulate the flow of BMPs within the embryonic morphogenetic field. BMPs secreted by the dorsal Spemann organizer tissue are released by metalloproteinases of the Tolloid family, which cleave Chordin at a distance of where they were produced. The dorsal center secretes Chordin, Noggin, BMP2 and ADMP. The ventral center of the embryo secretes BMP4, BMP7, Sizzled, Crossveinless-2 and Tolloid-related. Crossveinless-2 binds Chordin/BMP complexes, facilitating their flow towards the ventral side, where BMPs are released by Tolloid allowing peak BMP signaling. Self-regulation occurs because transcription of ventral genes is induced by BMP while transcription of dorsal genes is repressed by BMP signals. This assures that for each action of Spemann''s organizer there is a reaction in the ventral side of the embryo. Because both dorsal and ventral centers express proteins of similar biochemical activities, they can compensate for each other. A novel biochemical pathway of extracellular growth factor signaling regulation has emerged from these studies in Xenopus. This remarkable dorsal-ventral positional information network has been conserved in evolution and is ancestral to all bilateral animals.

PubMed ID: 19733655
PMC ID: PMC2803698
Article link: Mech Dev.
Grant support: HD21502-23 NICHD NIH HHSHoward Hughes Medical Institute , R01 HD021502-23 NICHD NIH HHS , R01 HD021502 NICHD NIH HHS , R37 HD021502 NICHD NIH HHS , R01 HD021502-23 NICHD NIH HHS , R01 HD021502 NICHD NIH HHSHoward Hughes Medical Institute , HD21502-23 NICHD NIH HHS

Genes referenced: admp bmp1 bmp2 bmp4 bmp7.1 bmper chrd.1 nog sox2 sptssb szl xk81a1

Morpholinos referenced: admp MO1 bmp2 MO1 bmp4 MO1 bmp7.2 MO1

References:
Akiyama-Oda, 2006, Pubmed[+]


Article Images: [+] show captions

My Xenbase: [ Log-in / Register ]
version: [4.6.0]

Major funding for Xenbase is provided by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, grant P41 HD064556