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XB-ART-4046
Dev Dyn. February 1, 2004; 229 (2): 289-99.

Pilot morpholino screen in Xenopus tropicalis identifies a novel gene involved in head development.

Kenwrick S , Amaya E , Papalopulu N .


Abstract
The diploid frog X. tropicalis has recently been adopted as a model genetic system, but loss-of-function screens in Xenopus have not yet been performed. We have undertaken a pilot functional knockdown screen in X. tropicalis for genes involved in nervous system development by injecting antisense morpholino (MO) oligos directed against X. tropicalis mRNAs. Twenty-six genes with primary expression in the nervous system were selected as targets based on an expression screen previously conducted in X. laevis. Reproducible phenotypes were observed for six and for four of these, a second MO gave a similar result. One of these genes encodes a novel protein with previously unknown function. Knocking down this gene, designated pinhead, results in severe microcephaly, whereas, overexpression results in macrocephaly. Together with the early embryonic expression in the anterior neural plate, these data indicate that pinhead is a novel gene involved in controlling head development.

PubMed ID: 14745953
Article link: Dev Dyn.

Genes referenced: chrd.1 ctnnbl1 gal.2 hmgb3 id3 magoh ogt pnhd

Morpholinos referenced: akirin1 MO1 arl6ip1 MO1 ccnb3 MO1 cited4 MO1 ctnnbl1 MO1 ctnnbl1 MO2 hes9.1 MO1 hmgb3 MO2 hmgb3 MO3 id3 MO4 id3 MO5 magoh MO1 magoh MO2 marcksl1 MO2 mgc69520 MO1 mgc75753 MO1 naca.2 MO1 ogt MO1 ogt MO2 otx2 MO2 pcna MO1 pitx2 MO1 pnhd MO1 pnhd MO2 pnhd MO3 pou5f3.1 MO3 ppdpf MO1 rcc1 MO1 rcl1 MO1 rhou MO1 sox2 MO3 sox3 MO1 stmn1 MO1


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