Due to necessary maintenance, Xenbase will be unavailable from December 24-29, 2014. We apologize for the inconvenience.

Click on this message to dismiss it.
Click here to close Hello! We notice that you are using Internet Explorer, which is not supported by Xenbase and may cause the site to display incorrectly. We suggest using a current version of Chrome, FireFox, or Safari.
XB-ART-44233
Cell Physiol Biochem. January 1, 2011; 27 (5): 443-52.

Structural basis of slow activation gating in the cardiac I Ks channel complex.

Strutz-Seebohm N , Pusch M , Wolf S , Stoll R , Tapken D , Gerwert K , Attali B , Seebohm G .


Abstract
Accessory β-subunits of the KCNE gene family modulate the function of various cation channel α-subunits by the formation of heteromultimers. Among the most dramatic changes of biophysical properties of a voltage-gated channel by KCNEs are the effects of KCNE1 on KCNQ1 channels. KCNQ1 and KCNE1 are believed to form nativeI(Ks) channels. Here, we characterize molecular determinants of KCNE1 interaction with KCNQ1 channels by scanning mutagenesis, double mutant cycle analysis, and molecular dynamics simulations. Our findings suggest that KCNE1 binds to the outer face of the KCNQ1 channel pore domain, modifies interactions between voltage sensor, S4-S5 linker and the pore domain, leading to structural modifications of the selectivity filter and voltage sensor domain. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest a stable interaction of the KCNE1 transmembrane α-helix with the pore domain S5/S6 and part of the voltage sensor domain S4 of KCNQ1 in a putative pre-open channel state. Formation of this state may induce slow activation gating, the pivotal characteristic of native cardiac I(Ks) channels. This new KCNQ1-KCNE1 model may become useful for dynamic modeling of disease-associated mutant I(Ks) channels.

PubMed ID: 21691061
Article link: Cell Physiol Biochem.

Genes referenced: kcne1 kcnq1
Antibodies referenced:
Morpholinos referenced:

My Xenbase: [ Log-in / Register ]
version: [3.3]


Major funding for Xenbase is provided by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, grant P41 HD064556