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XB-ART-46501
Genome Biol January 1, 2011; 12 (5): 222.

The lamin protein family.

Dittmer TA , Misteli T .


Abstract
The lamins are the major architectural proteins of the animal cell nucleus. Lamins line the inside of the nuclear membrane, where they provide a platform for the binding of proteins and chromatin and confer mechanical stability. They have been implicated in a wide range of nuclear functions, including higher-order genome organization, chromatin regulation, transcription, DNA replication and DNA repair. The lamins are members of the intermediate filament (IF) family of proteins, which constitute a major component of the cytoskeleton. Lamins are the only nuclear IFs and are the ancestral founders of the IF protein superfamily. Lamins polymerize into fibers forming a complex protein meshwork in vivo and, like all IF proteins, have a tripartite structure with two globular head and tail domains flanking a central α-helical rod domain, which supports the formation of higher-order polymers. Mutations in lamins cause a large number of diverse human diseases, collectively known as the laminopathies, underscoring their functional importance.

PubMed ID: 21639948
PMC ID: PMC3219962
Article link: Genome Biol

Genes referenced: igf2bp3 lmna lmnb1
GO keywords: lamin binding


Article Images: [+] show captions
References:
Aaronson, 1975, Pubmed [+]


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