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XB-ART-53846
Dev Neurobiol. July 18, 2017;

Neuronal degeneration and regeneration induced by axotomy in the olfactory epithelium of Xenopus laevis.

Cervino AS , Paz DA , Frontera JL .


Abstract
The olfactory epithelium (OE) has the remarkable capability to constantly replace olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) due to the presence of neural stem cells (NSCs). For this reason, the OE provides an excellent model to study neurogenesis and neuronal differentiation. In the present work, we induced neuronal degeneration in the OE of Xenopus laevis larvae by bilateral axotomy of the olfactory nerves. We found that axotomy induces specific- neuronal death through apoptosis between 24 and 48h post-injury. In concordance, there was a progressive decrease of the mature-ORN marker OMP until it was completely absent 72h post-injury. On the other hand, neurogenesis was evident 48h post-injury by an increase in the number of proliferating basal cells as well as NCAM-180- GAP-43+ immature neurons. Mature ORNs were replenished 21 days post-injury and the olfactory function was partially recovered, indicating that new ORNs were integrated into the olfactory bulb glomeruli. Throughout the regenerative process no changes in the expression pattern of the neurotrophin Brain Derivate Neurotrophic Factor were observed. Taken together, this work provides a sequential analysis of the neurodegenerative and subsequent regenerative processes that take place in the OE following axotomy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol, 2017.

PubMed ID: 28719101
Article link: Dev Neurobiol.

Genes referenced: bdnf casp3 gap43 krt5.2 ncam1 omp

Antibodies referenced: Bdnf Ab2 BrdU Ab2 Casp3 Ab1 Gap43 Ab1 Krt5.2 Ab1 Ncam1 Ab1 Omp Ab1


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