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Xine Volume 13 - Issue 10, December 2013


Course: CELL & DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY OF XENOPUS @ CSHL

*CELL & DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY OF XENOPUSAPRIL 4-15, 2014*
http://meetings.cshl.edu/courses/c-xeno10.shtml

*Application deadline: January 31, 2013*

Instructors:
Amy Sater, University of Houston
Gerald Thomsen, Stony Brook University
Karen Liu, King's College London

Dear Colleague - We're pleased to announce the upcoming Xenopus Course at
CSHL, and ask you to consider sending a member of your laboratory or group
to participate, and to pass this announcement along to anyone who may
benefit from this training. A diverse faculty will bring the most
up-to-date results and theories to the students, making this course a
valuable resource for young researchers starting out in this fast-moving
and expansive field.

Xenopus is the leading vertebrate model for the analysis of gene function
in development. The combination of lineage analysis, gene-knockout
strategies, experimental manipulation of the embryo, and
genomic/bioinformatic techniques, makes it ideal for studies on the
molecular control of embryo patterning, morphogenesis and organogenesis.
Moreover, recent advances in Xenopus genomics offer new opportunities to
integrate computational strategies with experimental approaches, including
genome editing-based strategies for gene knockout. The course combines
intensive laboratory training with daily lectures from recognized experts
in the field. Students will learn both emerging technologies and classical
techniques to study gene function in Xenopus development. An important
element will be the informal interaction between students and course
faculty.

Technologies to be covered will include: oocyte and embryo culture, lineage
analysis and experimental manipulation of embryos, time lapse imaging of
morphogenesis, gain and loss of function analysis using mRNAs, antisense
oligonucleotides and the CRISPR/Cas9 system, whole mount in situ
hybridization, immunocytochemistry, genomics and bioinformatics, chromatin
immunoprecipitation, preparation of transgenic embryos, and use of Xenopus
tropicalis for genetic analyses.

The Cell and Developmental Biology of Xenopus course is designed for those
new to the Xenopus field, as well as for those wanting a refresher course
in emerging technologies. For instance, participants this year will be able
to target their favorite gene by CRISPR/Cas9 methods. The course is open to
investigators from all countries.

Substantial scholarships towards tuition, room and board are available
based on stated need (apply in writing). Check out the website for more
details, and please feel free to contact me if you have any questions.
http://meetings.cshl.edu/courses/c-xeno10.shtml

Best regards,

*- Jerry*

Gerald H. Thomsen, PhD
Professor
Biochemistry and Cell Biology
Center for Developmental Genetics
Stony Brook University
Stony Brook, NY 11794-5215

gerald.h.thomsen at stonybrook.edu
office phone: 001-631-632-8536

live link Re: Course: CELL & DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY OF XENOPUS @ CSHL

Please note the live link to the Xenopus course:
http://meetings.cshl.edu/courses/2014/c-xeno14.shtml

sorry about the dead one!

*- Jerry*

On Wed, Dec 4, 2013 at 10:38 AM, Gerald Thomsen <
gerald.h.thomsen at stonybrook.edu> wrote:

>
> *CELL & DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY OF XENOPUSAPRIL 4-15, 2014*
> http://meetings.cshl.edu/courses/c-xeno10.shtml
>
> *Application deadline: January 31, 2013*
>
> Instructors:
> Amy Sater, University of Houston
> Gerald Thomsen, Stony Brook University
> Karen Liu, King's College London
>
> Dear Colleague - We're pleased to announce the upcoming Xenopus Course at
> CSHL, and ask you to consider sending a member of your laboratory or group
> to participate, and to pass this announcement along to anyone who may
> benefit from this training. A diverse faculty will bring the most
> up-to-date results and theories to the students, making this course a
> valuable resource for young researchers starting out in this fast-moving
> and expansive field.
>
> Xenopus is the leading vertebrate model for the analysis of gene function
> in development. The combination of lineage analysis, gene-knockout
> strategies, experimental manipulation of the embryo, and
> genomic/bioinformatic techniques, makes it ideal for studies on the
> molecular control of embryo patterning, morphogenesis and organogenesis.
> Moreover, recent advances in Xenopus genomics offer new opportunities to
> integrate computational strategies with experimental approaches, including
> genome editing-based strategies for gene knockout. The course combines
> intensive laboratory training with daily lectures from recognized experts
> in the field. Students will learn both emerging technologies and classical
> techniques to study gene function in Xenopus development. An important
> element will be the informal interaction between students and course
> faculty.
>
> Technologies to be covered will include: oocyte and embryo culture,
> lineage analysis and experimental manipulation of embryos, time lapse
> imaging of morphogenesis, gain and loss of function analysis using mRNAs,
> antisense oligonucleotides and the CRISPR/Cas9 system, whole mount in situ
> hybridization, immunocytochemistry, genomics and bioinformatics, chromatin
> immunoprecipitation, preparation of transgenic embryos, and use of Xenopus
> tropicalis for genetic analyses.
>
> The Cell and Developmental Biology of Xenopus course is designed for those
> new to the Xenopus field, as well as for those wanting a refresher course
> in emerging technologies. For instance, participants this year will be able
> to target their favorite gene by CRISPR/Cas9 methods. The course is open to
> investigators from all countries.
>
> Substantial scholarships towards tuition, room and board are available
> based on stated need (apply in writing). Check out the website for more
> details, and please feel free to contact me if you have any questions.
> http://meetings.cshl.edu/courses/c-xeno10.shtml
>
> Best regards,
>
> *- Jerry*
>
> Gerald H. Thomsen, PhD
> Professor
> Biochemistry and Cell Biology
> Center for Developmental Genetics
> Stony Brook University
> Stony Brook, NY 11794-5215
>
> gerald.h.thomsen at stonybrook.edu
> office phone: 001-631-632-8536
>
>
>

New Xenbase website launched

Attachments: Xine press release.pdf

Xenbase v3.0 has been launched with great new features:

• New user-friendly landing page- a whole new look and feel!
• New Xenopus laevis Genome v7.1 pre-release from the Xenopus Genome Consortium, and just released by the JGI is now available on GBrowse, BLAST+ and for FTP download.
X. laevis genome v7.1 has:
2.7 Gb total scaffold length
50% of the assembly in contigs >19.3kb
• Antibody Database - search through 500+ curated antibody reagents known to work in Xenopus.
• Faster BLAST+ Server
• Improved Genome Browser - the latest version of GBrowse features:
DNA sequence displayed for zooms >100bp
faster, cleaner interface with many optional tracks
download snapshots as png's or send to others as a link
download track data in gff3, FASTA, or GenBank format for selected regions, entire scaffold, or entire track across the genome.
• Expanded Community Meetings and Resources.
• New miRNA expression catalog from the Wheeler lab.
• New Morpholino Wiki listing 600+ published MOs.
• Spotlight on new high-impact Xenopus research articles.

Continue to use Xenbase to find:

• 15,000+ individual gene pages with searchable gene expression patterns and associated literature.
• Xenopus developmental timing and anatomy descriptions
• NF stage images.
• Comprehensive library of over 47,000 Xenopus research articles
• Updated Xenopus laboratory protocols and reagents
• Links to Xenopus stock centers: EXRC (UK), NXR (USA), CRB (France), and NBRP (Japan)
• Contact information for Xenopus researchers and labs and job postings.

Provide comments and feedback to help improve our service to advance your research!

NB: Please see attached Word doc or pdf format for live links to features.

Dr. Christina James-Zorn
Xenbase Curator
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital
Division of Developmental Biology
3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati,
Ohio 45229-3039
513.636.3291
christina.james_zorn at cchmc.org

http://www.xenbase.org

xenopus species?

Does anyone know of any labs that might have live specimens of  X. largeni, x. ruwenzoriensis,  X. fraseri, X. itombwensis or Pipa carvalhoi? Any help you could supply would be greatly appreciated.

Jay King, DVM, MS
ninjavet9 at yahoo.com

xenopus species?

Try Darcy Kelly at Columbia University:
*dbk3 at columbia.edu*<http://www.columbia.edu/cu/biology/faculty/kelley/kelley-e.html>

On Wed, Dec 11, 2013 at 1:17 PM, Jay D. King <ninjavet9 at yahoo.com> wrote:

> Does anyone know of any labs that might have live specimens of X.
> largeni, x. ruwenzoriensis, X. fraseri, X. itombwensis or Pipa carvalhoi?
> Any help you could supply would be greatly appreciated.
>
> Jay King, DVM, MS
> ninjavet9 at yahoo.com
>
> _______________________________________________
> Xenopus mailing list
> Xenopus at lists.mbl.edu
> http://lists.mbl.edu/mailman/listinfo/xenopus
>
>


--
Sally A. Moody, Ph.D.
Professor of Anatomy and Regenerative Biology
George Washington University
School of Medicine and Health Sciences
2300 I Street, NW, Washington, DC, 20037, USA
202-994-2878
Editor-in-Chief: *genesis, The Journal of Genetics and Development*
Editor: *Principles of Developmental Genetics, 2nd edition*

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version: [4.6.0]

Major funding for Xenbase is provided by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, grant P41 HD064556